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9780801868030 Add to Cart Academic Inspection Copy

Zones of Instability:

Literature, Postcolonialism, and the Nation
  • ISBN-13: 9780801868030
  • Publisher: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS
    Imprint: JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Author: Szeman, Imre
  • Price: AUD $102.00
  • Stock: 0 in stock
  • Availability: This book is temporarily out of stock, order will be despatched as soon as fresh stock is received.
  • Local release date: 15/04/2004
  • Format: Hardback 264 pages Weight: 0g
  • Categories: Literature & literary studies [D]Literary studies: general [DSB]
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Attempts by writers and intellectuals in former colonies to create unique national cultures are often thwarted by a context of global modernity, which discourages particularity and uniqueness. In describing unstable social and political cultures, such ''third-world intellectuals'' often find themselves torn between the competing literary requirements of the ''local'' culture of the colony and the cosmopolitan, ''world'' culture introduced by Western civilization. In Zones of Instability, Imre Szeman examines the complex relationship between literature and politics by exploring the production of nationalist literature in the former British empire. Taking as his case studies the regions of the British Caribbean, Nigeria, and Canada, Szeman analyzes the work of authors for whom the idea of the''nation'' and literature are inexorably entwined, such as Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, C.L.R. James, Frantz Fanon, and V.S. Naipaul. Szeman focuses on literature created in the two decades after World War II, decades in which the future prospects for many colonies went from extreme political optimism to extreme political disappointment. He finds that the ''nation'' can be read as that space in which literature is thought to be able to conjoin two things that history has separated -- the writer and the people.

AcknowledgmentsIntroduction: The Politics of Postcolonial Nationalist Literature1. The Nation as Problem and Possibility2. Caribbean Space: Lamming, Naipaul, and Federation3. The Novel after the Nation: Nigeria after Biafra4. The Persistence of the Nation: Literature and Criticism in CanadaConclusion: National Culture and GlobalizationNotesIndex

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