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    Return to the Country

    The story of Australia's Indigenous Protected Areas
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    In 75 Indigenous Protected Areas across the nation, traditional owners are managing their land for a better future. Protected areas are defined areas of land or sea, dedicated and managed in order to preserve the long-term sustainability and conservation of the region, including the associated ecosystems and cultural values. In Australia, this includes lands such as national parks, state reserves, protected private land and Indigenous Protected Areas. Indigenous people have lived on this continent for tens of thousands of years, and have amassed a wide body of knowledge, experience and philosophies. In this time, Aboriginal people have adapted to rapid and significant environmental changes with an intricate knowledge of the land. Country sustains them and in return, they care for their country. The connection is deeply spiritual and unwavering. Learn about the IPA program, investigating different ways the land is being managed and how culture is being preserved around Australia
    • Discusses key points in the cross-curriculum priorities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Histories and Cultures and Sustainability • Features a wide variety of information on different IPAs, as well as plant, animal and conservation topics – a handy range of entry points for teachers and students • Striking, modern photographs shot by Australian Geographic photographers
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